Academic Lead – Dr Dan Vickers –  (Sheffield)

Awarded as part of the White Rose Social Science Doctoral Training Centre

A simple look at today’s papers reveals the issues that are effecting the British population: pensions and an ageing population, immigration and an increasing population, tensions between multicultural populations, tax and welfare reform, and the unequal geographic distribution of public sector employment and unemployment. Society in Britain is changing at an ever increasing speed and this is having a profound effect on the everyday lives of every man, woman and child in Britain today.

The main topics of this White Rose ESRC Studentship Network are concerned with how the British population is changing: understanding how and to what extent these changes can be seen and measured and the effect these changes have on different groups of people whether we stratify these groups by geography, ethnicity, age or any other social phenomena. The inequalities that can be seen in opportunities and outcomes form key debates that are shaping and will shape society throughout the rest of the 21st century.

The network brings together three academics with differing, but complimentary research expertise: Dr Dan Vickers (Sheffield) has a research focus on the integration of geography with social difference and social segregation, particularly the defining of social areas and differences between areas. Dr Paul Norman (Leeds) has a background in researching demographic change and health within the UK with a strong focus on geography. Dr Rowland Atkinson (York) has a strong background in urban studies, neighbourhood and urban change, particularly the formation of new communities such as the phenomena of gated communities.

Network Projects

The Changing Nature and Extent of Ethnic and Social Segregation within British Cities

Principal Supervisor – Dan Vickers (Sheffield)

Silver cities: The ageing population of the urban north

Principal Supervisor – Rowland Atkinson (York)

Geographical, social and area type mobility: trajectories of selective sorting over time by health status and ethnic group

Principal Supervisor – Paul Norman (Leeds)